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7 Creative Sketchbook to inspire

 An A2 Art sketchbook page by Ruth Beeley:

This A Level Art sketchbook page is exactly as a high school Art sketchbook should be: an exciting investigation of media and ideas. Using ‘modrock’ (a plaster of paris bandage) and glue to create raised areas, with other mixed mediums such as wire, ink and Biro pen, Ruth adds careful and detailed drawings over a chaotic ground. The piece is not a finished, resolved image: rather, it is a beautiful and competently executed exploration of ideas.

An A2 Art sketchbook page by Lucy Luu:

At its essence, a sketchbook page should provide insight into a student’s ideas and intentions, as well as revealing the influence of other artists. This A Level Art sketchbook page is beautiful in its simplicity: devoid of all superfluous decoration, it shows a dedicated and committed student learning a technique from an artist and then carefully applying this to original artwork.

Sketchbook pages completed as part of a VCE Studio Arts folio by Australian high school student Heesu Kim:

Heesu writes about the project: “I want to create a narrative-like line of work that illustrates the process of birth and innocence to slow corruption and finally death of soul. For me, the ‘death of soul’ is when our minds are shaped to fit the norms of society and cut to think only in the values that it presents. This process both starts and finishes at high school. Ultimately the conclusion is thousands of machine-like individuals, fresh and ready to become slaves to the system. I talk to my friends and see peers that conclude their whole lives and future based on how high their ATAR score is, who adopt dreams that their parents decide for them, dreams that make more money, instead of following their real passion. I’m aware of it but accept it myself as there is no other choice but to. So subtle and complete is the control over us that we embrace it, actively acknowledge to it, and at the same time still suffer emotionally under it.”

A Level Art sketchbook pages by Lisa Jiang:

Many high school Painting / Fine Art students worry that their sketchbooks must be wild, gestural explorations, with layers of media exploding from each page. This sketchbook is a reminder that this is not always the case. Here, a sketchbook layout has been approached with the sophisticated eye of a graphic designer; each page taking on the aesthetic of a contemporary magazine.

An AS Art Sketchbook page by Charlotte Taylor: 

This AS Art sketchbook page shows visual research at its purest. Students often forget that research doesn’t just involve analysing artist work; it includes the visual investigation of forms: drawing items from a range of angles and in a range of different mediums. Here, Charlotte has worked over scraps of lined note paper (some with maths equations left on them) with meticulous, detailed pen drawings, developing familiarity with the human form.

An A Level Fine Art sketchbook page by Sally Al Nasser:  

This rich and vibrant A Level Art sketchbook page is a reminder that the high school sketchbook is a prime opportunity to demonstrate your love of Art to the examiner. Here, the lavish, gestural, brush strokes contrast with careful annotation, resulting in a composition that oozes passion. Every speck of the page has been considered and worked over, using colours that integrate and link with the Chrissy Angliker artworks analysed. The whole page thus becomes an opportunity to absorb information from an artist; imbued with technique, emotion and style.

An AS Level Art sketchbook by David Wasserman from Monks Dyke Tennyson College, Lincolnshire, United Kingdom:

Above all, a sketchbook should be a place for developing and refining ideas. It should show thought processes and provide insights into a student’s thinking. This sketchbook page is a helpful reminder that a Fine Art / Painting and Related Media sketchbooks need not be overly gestural or expressive: those who prefer working in a tighter, ordered, structured style should not be afraid of doing so. Indeed, such presentations can be less distracting and allow emphasis to be placed exactly where it belongs: the artwork. Here the integration of artist work, student photographs and observational drawings clearly show the journey taken while exploring and developing ideas.